Industries Energy/Green

20-megawatt solar utility project announced for Northampton County

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In what was the second solar announcement in a week, Gov. Terry McAuliffe said Wednesday that Hecate Energy LLC has received a permit for a new utility-scale solar facility to be built in Cape Charles in Northampton County. Once complete, the 20-megawatt project will provide enough energy to power more than 3,000 households throughout the region.

“This project builds on important investments we are making in the solar industry across Virginia,” McAuliffe said in an announcement.  “Investing in clean, renewable power sources will continue to cut carbon emissions and increase energy security throughout the commonwealth.’’

Hecate Energy, based in Chicago, says on its website that it delivers power projects from inception through construction and continuing operations. The company specializes in solar and wind power, natural gas plants and energy storage.


Construction of the 185-acre facility will incorporate an innovative tracking system that maximizes energy output with the efficient use of available sunlight.

On Aug. 11, the governor’s office announced that the state had approved approved a permit for a new solar facility to be built by Firestone Solar LLC, a subsidiary of Virginia Solar.

The 19.8-megawatt project will be the first utility-scale solar generator of its kind in Buckingham County.

Construction of the 200-acre facility is expected to begin early next year and to be completed by the end of 2017. Costs are estimated at between $30 and $35 million. December 2014, the governor announced that the state would procure up to 8 percent of its electricity consumption from renewable resources within three years. The goal represents approximately 110 megawatts of installed renewable capacity.

The facility will interconnect with the Old Dominion Electric Cooperative and A&N Electric Cooperative system.  According to the governor’s office, the “permit by rule,” issued by the Virginia Department of Environmental Quality, contains provisions to ensure the environment is protected at the Cape Charles site.

“As a Virginia native with family ties to the Eastern Shore region, the 20-megawatt Cherrydale solar development has been an exciting and gratifying project with which to be involved,” said Preston Schultz of Hecate Energy LLC.  “In my opinion, the Commonwealth of Virginia Permit by Rule process strikes the right balance between protecting critical local environmental, cultural and historical resources while at the same time providing opportunities for the new clean energy economy to take root and flourish in the Old Dominion.”

On Aug. 11, the governor’s office announced that the state had approved approved a permit for a new solar facility to be built by Firestone Solar LLC, a subsidiary of Virginia Solar. the 19.8-megawatt project will be the first utility-scale solar generator of its kind in Buckingham County.

Construction of the 200-acre facility is expected to begin early next year and to be completed by the end of 2017. Costs are estimated at between $30 and $35 million. In December 2014, the governor announced that the state would procure up to 8 percent of its electricity consumption from renewable resources within three years. The goal represents approximately 110 megawatts of installed renewable capacity.






 




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