Industries

Hampton Roads-For the Record

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ADS Inc., a Virginia Beach-based supplier of equipment to military and emergency response markets, acquired Mar-Vel International of

Pennsauken, N.J., in an effort to expand its business with state and local law enforcement. Mar-Vel will operate as a wholly owned

subsidiary, retaining its name and locations. It will also manage the sales and operations of ADS’ law enforcement division. (The

Virginian-Pilot)

Bon Secours Hampton Roads Health System laid off 35 to 45 employees, mostly in clerical and support positions, in a move to alter its

staffing needs after falling short of financial goals. Some of the employees may be able to take other jobs with Bon Secours, which still

actively recruits and hires nursing and physician staff. The system employs 4,000 workers in Hampton Roads. (The Virginian-Pilot)

A new-style Marriott hotel opened in Chesapeake. The 120-room Courtyard by Marriott Newport News Airport has a different look and design in

its lobby and rooms than traditional Courtyard facilities. This location is the first of 12 new-style operations planned for this year.

Another 100 will open in 2009. The hotel is owned and operated by LTD Management of Chesapeake, which runs an additional 13 locations for the

chain. (Daily Press)

Eastern Virginia Medical School received a $100 million grant from the U.S. Agency for International Development for work on a product to

prevent the transmission of the virus that causes AIDS. The funds will be used to advance research on various forms of microbicides such as

topical gels, creams, tablets, films or oral pills to block HIV and other sexually transmitted diseases. The work is done through EVMS’

CONRAD program, based in Arlington, with employees there, and in Norfolk, Atlanta and West Chester, ADS Inc., a Virginia Beach-based supplier

of equipment to military and emergency response markets, acquired Mar-Vel International of Pennsauken, N.J., in an effort to expand its

business with state and local law enforcement. Mar-Vel will operate as a wholly owned subsidiary, retaining its name and locations. It will

also manage the sales and operations of ADS’ law enforcement division. (The Virginian-Pilot)

Bon Secours Hampton Roads Health System laid off 35 to 45 employees, mostly in clerical and support positions, in a move to alter its

staffing needs after falling short of financial goals. Some of the employees may be able to take other jobs with Bon Secours, which still

actively recruits and hires nursing and physician staff. The system employs 4,000 workers in Hampton Roads. (The Virginian-Pilot)

A new-style Marriott hotel opened in Chesapeake. The 120-room Courtyard by Marriott Newport News Airport has a different look and design in

its lobby and rooms than traditional Courtyard facilities. This location is the first of 12 new-style operations planned for this year.

Another 100 will open in 2009. The hotel is owned and operated by LTD Management of Chesapeake, which runs an additional 13 locations for the

chain. (Daily Press)

Eastern Virginia Medical School received a $100 million grant from the U.S. Agency for International Development for work on a product to

prevent the transmission of the virus that causes AIDS. The funds will be used to advance research on various forms of microbicides such as

topical gels, creams, tablets, films or oral pills to block HIV and other sexually transmitted diseases. The work is done through EVMS’

CONRAD program, based in Arlington, with employees there, and in Norfolk, Atlanta and West Chester, Pa. (The Virginian-Pilot)
Pa. (The Virginian-Pilot)

Norfolk City Council approved a deal that will open the way for a 200,000-square-foot, nine-story medical office complex near the city’s

center. The Fort Norfolk Plaza Project, first announced three years ago, had been delayed by problems with financing. After changing the

plans and securing new investors, officials hope to see ground broken this fall. Dr. Keith Newby of Norfolk is the main developer. Lauth

Property Group of Indianapolis leads financing. The $70 million project is 70 percent leased and will be located across Brambleton Avenue

from Sentara Norfolk General Hospital, Eastern Virginia Medical School and Children’s Hospital of The King’s Daughters. (The Virginian-Pilot)

Norfolk Southern Corp. received a $50,000 grant from the Federal Railroad Administration to do further research into battery-powered electric

locomotives. The railroad company will add $65,000 to the project. The grant, one of 13 announced by the FRA, is geared toward design of a

prototype battery for electric locomotives that would reduce fuel costs and emissions. (The Virginian-Pilot)
Under a new labor agreement, about 5,000 Norfolk Southern engineers will receive a 19 percent raise over the next six years and a bonus tied

to company performance. Workers covered by the Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers and Trainmen will get a 3.2 percent raise each year

through 2014. The railroad has had a similar deal with the union since 1996. (The Virginian-Pilot)[with annual compounding, this comes to

almost 21% over six years/hs]

Smithfield Foods Inc., a Smithfield-based pork products producer, joined 36 other companies in a federal program to deter employment of

undocumented workers. The ICE Mutual Agreement Between Government and Employers, or IMAGE program, is administered by the U.S. Immigration

and Customs Enforcement office and provides training to companies which agree to aid deterrents such as a tip line to report the employment

of undocumented workers. Smithfield is one of 11 new associate members, which means it has not fulfilled all 10 program requirements. (The

Virginian-Pilot)

The U.S. Department of Commerce declared the Chesapeake Bay’s blue crab fishery a disaster. The bay’s blue crab population has dropped nearly

70 percent in the past 15 years. Experts cite pollution and overfishing for the decline but the disaster designation was based solely on

ecological reasons. State officials in both Virginia and Maryland asked for the designation in May. The move may make watermen eligible for

federal assistance, although those funds will still have to be approved by Congress. (Richmond Times-Dispatch)

The Virginia Port Authority will seek to reduce staff and expand management positions in a major reorganization approved by its board. It

will be the biggest overhaul in about 30 years with the addition of three deputy executive directors, movement of sales and marketing

personnel to Virginia International Terminals Inc., and a staff reduction goal of seven percent. Employees over 50 on the 157-person staff

will be offered an early retirement buyout. (The Virginian-Pilot)

Harbor Group International bought the World Trade Center in downtown Norfolk. Details were not announced, but the building had an assessed

value of $39.4 million. It was owned by a fund managed by the Swiss banking company UBS. The deal gives Harbor Group more than 1 million

square feet of downtown office space. The firm bought the 11-story Town Point Center office building for $12.75 million in July and owns

Dominion Tower, the RBC Centura bank building and the Crown Center building. Opened in 1983, a major expansion gave it about 367,000 square

feet of Class A office space. (The Virginian-Pilot)

 


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